There's No Such Thing As TMI - Tools for the New Year

There's No Such Thing As TMI - Tools for the New Year

I want to open with a personal story: I learned I have a hearing impairment (and tinnitus) at age 48.  For years, I have had to pay closer attention to what people were saying and I increasingly asked questions to add clarity and context to conversations. Between you and me, my hearing “auto-correct” is often hilarious, and nowhere near what the person said!

 Taken out of context, hearing "there is no such thing as too much information," might sound unfortunate. Let me elaborate, and fast. When I consult with financial or philanthropic clients, I often start with the question, "What is your story?" followed by "There is no such thing as TMI." We are taught to self-censor, to keep it short, and I want the exact opposite to happen.

Winter Solstice Thoughts

Winter Solstice Thoughts

Winter Solstice and its message of reflection and renewal ended today. I posted each day for the 4 days…what follows is the collection of the 4 brief essays:

According to Forever Conscious, “The winter solstice celebrates the longest hours of darkness or the rebirth of the sun and is believed to hold powerful energy for regeneration, renewal, and self-reflection…

The winter solstice is a time of quiet energy, where you get the opportunity to look within yourself and focus on what you want and need. It’s a time to set goals and intentions for the coming year, to examine and let go of our past, and to make changes within ourselves. The solstice is essentially tied to personal awakening.

Not Temporary and Not Shelter

Not Temporary and Not Shelter

Last month, I traveled to El Paso (Texas) and Juarez (Mexico) to bear witness to the humanitarian crisis that continues to unfold and to volunteer with respite centers helping the migrants and asylum seekers.

When we hear of a child in a juvenile detention center, we wonder what was their crime — what did he/she do to be placed in detention? Right now, there are nearly 14,000 children in detention centers and shelters throughout this nation for crimes they did not commit. Either the children came to the United States with their parents who are legally seeking asylum and refuge from their homeland (which is not a crime) or were sent here for safety by loving and fearful parents. They did nothing wrong. Nor did their parents.

Aren’t You Seeking a Better Life?

Aren’t You Seeking a Better Life?

Last month, I traveled to El Paso (Texas) and Juarez (Mexico) to bear witness to the humanitarian crisis that continues to unfold and to volunteer with respite centers helping the migrants. Here is my first report — “Aren’t You Seeking a Better Life?”

In full disclosure, I lead 2 lives — distinct from each other. I have that luxury. And it is, indeed, a luxury to have these 2 concurrent lives.

Last month, the difference in these 2 worlds was glaring.

Did You or Did You Not Contribute to His Success

Among the many things that occur for me between the year-end and the year-beginning is the review of what I call my financial recipe.  The ingredients of this recipe include my budget (actual and planned), my philanthropic contributions (actual and planned), the income forecast for the coming year, tax preparation, and an examination of the alignment of my values with my money.  As with any recipe, the ingredients are all mixed up and baked together: the past year with the new year, the personal expenses with the professional expenses, the expected budget with the actual balance sheet, and the intellectual with the emotional.  It is the latter – the realistic versus the irrational – that always catches me by surprise.